Slackline

The origin of slacklining dates back to the 80s and can be attributed to the climbing community in Yosemite National Park. Climbers would use it as a pass time while at the same time training their core strength, balance skills and keeping their focus; basically all skills that contribute to better climbing. 

Generally, a 1"-2" wide nylon / poly...

The origin of slacklining dates back to the 80s and can be attributed to the climbing community in Yosemite National Park. Climbers would use it as a pass time while at the same time training their core strength, balance skills and keeping their focus; basically all skills that contribute to better climbing. 

Generally, a 1"-2" wide nylon / polyester webbing is being stretched between two trees (or any other 2 anchor points) and can vary between 15m-50m, the longer it is the more difficult it is the maintain balance. 

Outside the climbing community, recreational slacklining has become more and more popular over the past 10 years and has seen a huge increase in newcomers, groups that have formed, gear improvements and of course huge exposure through social media. It is considered a good balance training or even a moving meditation. It has gained so much attention that organizations such as the International Slackline Association have been founded to support the community. 

Meanwhile, the traditional slacklining has evolved to the point that completely different disciplines have established themselves such as:

Waterline

If a slackline is stretched across water it is described as waterline. This discipline tends to be more difficult because the constant movement of the water (constant moving ground) makes it harder to focus and control balance. Furthermore, the risk of injury is the lowest when waterlining since your landing in water. 

Highline

Highlining consists of fixing a slackline at extreme heights. One might think that this is a sport for thrill seekers, adrenaline junkies, but in fact these people are able to stay super calm and focused in these extreme situations. A highline is always backed up with several fail systems, so that if one thing goes wrong the line doesn't immediately cut loose. Most highliners wear a harness so that in case of a fall they only catch a small swing. Some however, just like in climbing, go free solo. No harness, no safety measure, the only thing they have in case of a fall is the reflex to hold on to the line. 

Trickline

A trickline is stretched in a way to allow more bouncing, such as a trampoline effect. On these lines athletes perform acrobatics involving bounces, jumps, flips and more. 

Yogaline

Here slackliners perform yoga poses on the slackline with the intention of increasing the difficulty of sometimes very simple poses.

Rodeoline

Rodeolining is a pretty new version of slacklining where the slackline has almost no tension and forms a sort of "U" form. Athletes then start swinging from left to right, which is called surfing. 

The choices are endless and difficult today so contact our Customer Service or send us a mail to help you choose the right product for your needs. 

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Slackline  There are 8 products.

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Showing 1 - 8 of 8 items